Skip to content

Monastiraki Metro Station in Athens

At Monastiraki Square, you’ll find streets lined with tiny shops, small museums, the ruins of Hadrian’s Library and even a Turkish mosque from 1759.

5243F052-9FB1-47F5-8E28-4869274FD216
Mosque Tzisdarakis (1759) You can see the Parthenon on the hill in the distance.
img_1779
Church of the Virgen, the only remains of the original monastery. This little church is now referred to as the little monastery, or monastiraki.

The Most Fascinating Site at Monastiraki

Below, in the metro station, is a little-known archeological site. Although we saw hundreds of tourists in the square above, we only saw two others in the half hour we spent below.

The woman at the ticket booth let us into the metro for free and told us how to get to the archeological treasures. There weren’t any signs pointing to it.

My husband Dan and I listened together to the Rick Steves podcast on Dan’s iPhone, as the famous travel show host explained the ruins to us, and how they were discovered during the station’s excavation in the 19th century.

The Monastiraki metro station
Commuters rush past it every day, and several smiled at our awe-struck faces.

In the 2nd century A.D., the Roman emperor Hadrian had engineers design a roof in order to create a sewer system.

img_1767
The fiberglass bridge is a clever way to preserve and show off the ancient ruins while keeping the Monastiraki metro Stratton fully funcional.
8EDBD265-4EAC-4F2D-B29B-F0D79658901B
The signage does an excellent job marking exactly what you are looking at, as well as showing how it all look in its time.

Down here, you will find remains of settlements dating as far back as the 8th century, B.C..

The ruins are so well maintained and integrated into the everyday hustle and bustle of this great city.

Take #iconic NYC Photos eBook by Aixa

13 thoughts on “Monastiraki Metro Station in Athens Leave a comment

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: